Bookmark and Share
|
  • Text +
  • Text -

Anthropology

Research Presentation Video

Click to watch Makda Aman '13 discuss her research project.

Creating a Ceramic Type Collection for a Prehistoric Pueblo Site

Joanmarie Del Vecchio (2015); Mentor(s): E. Charles Adams*
*University of Arizona

Abstract: This summer I participated in an archaeological field school run by the University of Arizona and University of Illinois at Chicago. As part of my experience I created a ceramic type collection for use by Chicago researchers, involving collection, typing and organization of over 100 potsherds of varying time periods and style. In Southwest archaeology, identification of ceramic types is crucial in determining the age of structures or artifacts, as ceramic patterns and production changed frequently over the almost millennium of pottery production. This creates a Linnaean-like system for identification of broader wares and more specific style types. My type collection is useful for researchers in that sherd samples collected in excavation can be compared to known samples of agreed-upon types. I aimed to create not just a physical product of sherds in bags, but a digital, easily-distributed type collection that can be multiplied for anyone working with Puebloan pottery.
Funding Provided by: The Wade Family Anthropology Field School Fund

Heading North: An Analysis of the Culture BehindLabor Migration in Ethiopia

Makda Aman (2013); Mentor(s): Pardis Mahdavi

Abstract: With thousands of Ethiopians migrating to the Middle East every year to find labor, the opportunities to study what encourages people to relocate are plenty. Working legally or not, many suffer severe human rights abuses and alienate themselves from their families during their time abroad. Whether it’s caused by issues ranging from misunderstandings between cultures to being underprepared for the labor for which they are hired, it’s clear that there’s a disparity between what’s happening in the place of employment and what’s being told to the interviewers before leavingEthiopia. Interning with an employment agency and conducting interviews with those who have worked as day-laborers, housekeepers, drivers, etc. has given me the opportunity to better understand this disparity.Prominent public service announcements and easier access to training centers hold the key to increasing awareness about the risks involved in migrating and being properly equipped for work.
Funding Provided by: Faucett Catalyst Fund

Contrasting Policies and Lived Experiences of Maternal Mortality in Tamil Nadu

Morgen Chalmiers (2013); Mentor(s): Pardis Mahdavi

Abstract: Since the publication of the 5th Millennium Development goal-to reduce maternal mortality by 75% by 2015-governments worldwide have stepped up interventions to prevent maternal deaths. Evaluations of these interventions have prioritized statistical success while largely neglecting women's own perspectives. Thus my own research sought to prioritize women's lived experiences in my examination of the sociocultural effects of initiatives to reduce maternal mortality in Tamil Nadu, a state in India that has been widely praised for its achievements in this area. Cash incentives attract poor women to government institutions, which have subsequently become overcrowded and unable to provide even the most basic aspects of quality care. These conditions further contribute to the culture of abuse-both verbal and physical-that is present in large government hospitals. Though I asked a variety of questions about women's birth experiences, I found that the women I interviewed tended to focus on the issue of abuse and their related fear of delivering in government hospitals. My report delves into their stories, their lives, and their births, as they themselves experienced them and unfortunately reveals that the results of Tamil Nadu's maternal health program are far more complicated than the simple success story told b ystatistics.
Funding Provided by: Aubrey H. and Eileen J. SeedStudent Research Fund

Hong Kong Parenting

Hannah Chasnov (2013); Mentor(s): Pardis Mahdavi

Abstract: This project is a study of parenting in HongKong. Its purpose is to examine how parents from various cultural and social economic backgrounds in this unique city differ in their parenting methods and values.In order to focus my participants, I observed and interviewed members of a single, diverse community inHong Kong – a University campus. I interviewed members of the HKUST community: faculty, spouse,staff and workers about their family lives and their decisions regarding their children. Three main categories can be used to summarize my findings: the importance of education and the large selection available in Hong Kong, the importance of retaining Chinese culture and language in an increasingly international community, and how a difference in income and status largely affect the role in which parents play in their children’s upbringing. Findings from this study on parenting can serve as a window to examine cultural values of Hong Kong residents, a culture often described as the intersection between the east and the west.
Funding Provided by: Faucett Catalyst Fund

Trafficking Terror: Illicit Networks Forces in Opposition

Justin Gutzwa (2014); Mentor(s): Pardis Mahdavi

Abstract: My summer research was centered around helping Professor Mahdavi conduct research for her newRutledge book, Trafficking Terror: Illicit NetworksForces in Opposition. The goal of the research was to discern the difference between different forms of trafficking and the war on terror. Increasingly, politicians, scholars, media outlets, and the general populous alike are trying to find some form of connection between trafficking and terrorism. AsProfessor Mahdavi writes in her work, the terms “trafficking” and “terror” are thrown around so interchangeably and attached that they have taken on their own hybrid combination of “traficking and terror.”My research determined that generally, such claims are centered around inconclusive evidence which are based on correlations found in oftentimes faulty data. Through reading scholarly articles and books, news outlets, and political documents, we were able to determine there to be little to no connection between the two concepts.Specifically, my readings were generally focused around three different types of trafficking: human, drug, and weapons trafficking. Each of these are connected to terrorism on varying degrees. As most of my research concluded, however, none are directly related to terrorism. In addition to researching and reading, I also proofread the written chapters of Professor Mahdavi’swork and compiled reference lists for her chapters.
Funding Provided by: Pomona College SURP

Research at Pomona