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March 2013 Events at Pomona College

Pomona College, one of the nation’s premier liberal arts colleges, is sponsoring the following on-campus events. Each of these events is open to the public and free of charge unless otherwise noted.

March 1

Conference: Law at the Fault Lines—9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Pomona College Frank Blue Room (260 E. Bonita Avenue, Claremont). The newly formed Southern California Law and Social Science (SoCLASS) Forum brings together scholars from Southern California to share their research in American, comparative and international law. The conference theme, “Law at the Fault Lines,” emphasizes the ways in which law influences and is influenced by “fault lines” between social and political groups. The conference will include three thematically organized panels – gender and law, marginalization and law, and transitional justice in comparative perspective.  Robert A. Kagan (Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Law, University of California, Berkeley) will deliver the luncheon keynote address, “American Adversarial Legalism: Fading, Spreading, Still Entrenched?” For details and bios of confirmed speakers and for the official conference schedule and program, visit www.soclass.org. Contact: soclassforum@gmail.com.

March 1 & 3

Pomona College Orchestra—Fri., 8 p.m.; Sun, 3 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Winner of the 2012 Pomona College Orchestra Concerto Competition, Ryan Luo ’16, violin, joins the orchestra in Brahms’ Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77. Also on the program are Shostakovich/Barshai’s Chamber Symphony in C minor, Op. 110a and Kodály’s Dances of Galanta. Eric Lindholm will conduct. Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

March 4

Lecture: Hollywood Cinema—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Crookshank 108 (140 W. Sixth St., Claremont). European literature, culture and film critic Elisabeth Bronfen will deliver a talk titled, “Hollywood Cinema: A Conceptual Space for Cultural Reflections.” Contact: nancy.jugan@pomona.edu.

March 5

Lecture: “Why Our Stories About the Chinese Revolution Are Not Good Enough”—11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Gail Hershatter (University of California, Santa Cruz) will deliver the Ena H. Thompson lecture, “The Girl Who Burned the Banknotes, or Why Our Stories About the Chinese Revolution Are Not Good Enough.” This lecture will examine the most common stories that scholars and other observers have told about gender and social change in the Chinese revolution.  Focusing on the life history of one young rural woman, it considers how those stories might be made richer and more complicated.  The lecture will be followed by a public reception. Contact: ge004747@pomona.edu.

March 5

Pomona College Jazz Ensemble—4:30 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall (Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont). The Pomona College Jazz Ensemble will present a program of music entitled, “An Afternoon in Paris: Jazz at Twilight,” directed by Barb Catlin. Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671 or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

March 7

Lecture: “Rattling the House that Gender Studies Built: Some Thoughts from Rural China”—11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Gail Hershatter (University of California, Santa Cruz) will deliver the Ena H. Thompson lecture, “Rattling the House that Gender Studies Built: Some Thoughts from Rural China.” Drawing examples from research in rural northwest China, this lecture will explore what feminist scholars have learned about gender as the field of women's studies has developed, and what other angles should be considered. Contact: ge004747@pomona.edu.

March 7

Novel Communities: A Conversation with Jonathan Lethem—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Crookshank 108 (140 W. Sixth St., Claremont). Certain novelists have become strongly associated with certain settings: Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles, Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh, Jonathan Lethem’s Brooklyn. In conversation, Jonathan Lethem (Pomona College) and James Peacock (Keele University, UK) will address the following questions: Does the novel, described by Mikhail Bakhtin as a “dialogic system,” come specially equipped to represent complex communities and places? How have novelists attempted to capture the ways in which different groups of people interrelate, and the ways individuals participate at any given moment in a multitude of groupings? If we assume that we are living in the era of globalization of increased mobility and extraterritoriality, how might writers engage with new forms of community, including those unbounded by local or national borders, such as virtual communities? And is any attempt to depict so-called “traditional” community values such as face-to-face relations and local color merely an exercise in nostalgia that ignores contemporary realities? Contact: nancy.jugan@pomona.edu.

March 7

Art After Hours—5 -11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

March 7-10

Theatre: Stand and Deliver—Thurs., Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 2 p.m., Pomona College Seaver Theatre (300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont). It's 1982 and Garfield High School in East L.A. is plagued by gang violence, funding cuts and a sixty percent dropout rate. Bucking the system, Jaime Escalante puts his faith in his students and teaches Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus. The students rise to the challenge and pass the AP exam, a test that only 2% of seniors nationally attempt. When the Educational Testing Service accuses them of cheating, the teacher and students are tested beyond what they could ever have imagined. Tickets are $10 general admission and $5 for faculty, staff, senior citizens and students. The Seaver Theatre Box Office is open Monday-Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and one hour prior to curtain times. Contact: (909) 607-4375.

March 7

Junior Recital with William Appleton, Piano— 9 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont). William Appleton ’14, piano, performs William Duckworth’s The Time Curve Preludes. Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671 or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

March 8

Senior Recital: Katie Bent '13, Mezzo-Soprano, and Ben De Winkle '13, Baritone—8 p.m., Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont). Katie Bent ’13, mezzo-soprano, and Ben De Winkle ’13, baritone, will perform music by Baksa, Brahms, Copland, Joseph De Winkle, Gershwin, Ravel and Schumann. Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671 or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

March 10

Concert: Bobby Bradford and the Mo’Tet—3 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Bobby Bradford, trumpet; Chuck Manning, saxophones; Michael Vlatkovich, trombone; Ken Rosser, guitar; Roberto Miranda, bass; Don Preston, piano; and Chris Garcia, drums, will perform a wide range of jazz from swing and grit to avant-garde notions. All Music Guide reviewer Scott Yanow calls their album Lost in L.A. “an adventurous style that is usually surprisingly accessible.” Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671 or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

March 14

Art After Hours—5-11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special“Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

March 14

Food Justice Film Series: Urban Roots—7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The film Urban Roots follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit, in light of the nation's collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future. Slow Food advocate, chef and author Alice Waters says of the film: “Detroit’s farmers are building a new and powerful urban economy, and providing an invaluable service to their community. We need empowering films like Urban Roots to keep us moving in the right direction.” The series is hosted by the Elemental Arts Initiative, the Environmental Analysis Program of the Claremont Colleges and the Sustainability Integration Office. It explores food justice issues, including health, access to food, sustainable agriculture and fairness for food producers. Each film is followed by a Q&A session hosted by Professor Char Miller, director of the Environmental Analysis program. Contact: char.miller@pomona.edu.

March 27

Presentations by Students in Professor Frances Pohl's Art and Activism Class—12:15 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Students in Pomona College Professor Frances Pohl’s Art and Activism course will present on artists in the Pomona College Museum of Art’s Art and Activism exhibition. Presentations are open to the public. Contact: (909) 607-7543 or justine.bae@pomona.edu.

March 27

Reading War: Goya, Photography, Critique—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Lebus Court 113 (145 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont).  Michael Iarocci (University of California, Berkeley) is a recognized leader in 18th and 19th-century Spanish literary and cultural studies. The subject of his talk involves an analysis of Francisco Goya's relationship to the photojournalism of war and the history of visual images in the 19th century. A reception will follow the talk at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact: mary.coffey@pomona.edu.

March 28

Lecture: “From Parchment to Cyberspace or Putting the Cogito into Digital Humanities”—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn 101 (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont). Stephen G. Nichols (professor emeritus, Johns Hopkins University) is one of the most distinguished medievalists in the world, most notably the author of Romanesque Signs: Early Medieval Narrative and Iconography and co-editor of The New Medievalism . He has devoted much of his time since 1996 to issues of digital editions of medieval manuscripts and more generally to the question of the future of the book and knowledge in the digital age.  Contact: jack.abecassis@pomona.edu.

March 28

Theatre for Young Audiences—7:30 p.m., Pomona College Seaver Theatre (300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont). In the annual performance of Theatre for Young Audiences, a collaboration of the Pomona College Department of Theatre and Dance and Fremont Middle School, Pomona College theatre students explore theatrical styles with middle school students in order to create a piece based upon works of literary and cultural significance. Contact: (909) 621-8186.

March 28

Art After Hours—5 -11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

March 30

Junior Recital: Albert Chang '14, Violin, and Roger Sheu '14, Piano—8 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building. Albert Chang ’14, violin, and Roger Sheu’14, piano, will perform music by Bach, Brahms, Messiaen, Ravel, Rachmaninoff and Takemitsu. Contact: concerts@pomona.edu or (909) 607-2671 or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Exhibitions

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Nuance of Sky — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont).  Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic Native American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. The exhibition, curated by Heap of Birds, places paintings, mono-prints, and sculptures by Heap of Birds in dialogue with objects from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including Plains beadwork, Navajo turquoise and Pomo feather basketry. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Project Series 45: Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Project Series 45: Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove is a suite of four new paintings based on Everberg’s exploration of the 1950 Japanese crime drama Rashomon by filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. For In a Grove, Everberg creates an almost hallucinatory environment as the four new large paintings wrap the viewer in an immersive atmosphere that alludes to the slippery nature of truth. For more than 10 years, Everberg has explored issues of meaning, memory and history through fluid abstractions that have multiple narrative and painterly layers.  In strikingly beautiful paintings, she explores how images work and how images mark the elusive passage of time. Everberg has developed an innovative technique of pouring glossy enamel paint onto horizontal canvases creating lush surfaces that blur representation and abstraction. With vibrant color and shimmering light, the images shift and change as the viewer moves around the work. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Many American artists of the 2oth and 21st centuries have made their artwork an integral part of their political activism. Some have created posters for specific campaigns, such as the election of political candidates or fundraising for civil rights organizations. Others have produced prints or paintings that speak to broader social or political issues, such as the pollution of the environment, the exploitation of agricultural and industrial workers, and racial intolerance. The images are sometimes direct and hard-hitting, sometimes poetic and introspective. This exhibition contains a sampling of such works from the late 1920s to the present, drawn primarily from the permanent collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. Curated by Pomona College Professor in the Humanities and Art History Frances Pohl, in conjunction with the art history seminar “Art and Activism.” Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

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