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February 2013 Events at Pomona College

Pomona College, one of the nation’s premier liberal arts colleges, is sponsoring the following on-campus events. Each of these events is open to the public and free of charge unless otherwise noted.

Feb. 1

Concert: Ussachevsky Memorial Festival— 8 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont).  Tom Flaherty directs performances celebrating the annual Ussachevsky Memorial Festival. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 2

Ussachevsky Memorial Festival - opening lecture/demo—3 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont).   The Ussachevsky Memorial Festival afternoon session features lectures and demonstrations with contemporary electronic music composers Frances White and James Prichett. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 2

Concert: Ussachevsky Memorial Festival— 8 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont).  The evening festival concert features electronic and acoustic selections by Cage, Davidovsky, Pomona College music faculty member Tom Flaherty and guest composer Frances White. Performers include: Rachel Rudich, shakuhachi; Sarah Thornblade, violin; Cynthia Fogg, viola; Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano, toy piano—all Pomona College music faculty members—and Nadia Shpachenko, piano, toy piano and others. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 6

Artist Kirsten Everberg Visits with Sandeep Mukherjee's Art Class—10 a.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Kirsten Everberg will meet with Pomona College Professor of Art Sandeep Mukherjee's art class in the Pomona College Museum of Art’s project space. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 6

Literary Series: Sheila Heti—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Crookshank 108 (140 W. Sixth St., Claremont). Sheila Heti's How Should A Person Be? has been one of the most celebrated literary novels of 2012.  She's the author of children's books, collections of short stories and a book of practical philosophy called The Chairs Are Where The People Go. Contact: nancy.jugan@pomona.edu.

Feb. 7

Art After Hours—5-11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont).  Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb 8

Recital with Todor Pelev, violin with Douglas Ashcraft, piano—8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Violinist and Pomona College Music Department faculty member Todor Pelev with pianist Douglas Ashcraft will perform music by Brahms, De Falla, Mozart and Vladigerov. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 9

Faculty Chamber Music Recital with the Eclipse Quartet—8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Hailed by the Los Angeles Times for their “spellbinding performance,” the Eclipse Quartet—Sarah Thornblade, violin; Sara Parkins, violin; Alma Lisa Fernandez, viola; and Maggie Parkins, cello–will offer a program featuring music from the 20th-century and present-day composers. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 11

Lecture: “Gangs, Mafias, and Cartels: What Determines the Forms and Fates of Organized Crime?”—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn 101 (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont). Sociologist Randall Collins (University of Pennsylvania) will present a comparison of different kinds of organized crime, focusing on what determines their form of organization—hierarchic, centralized, localized, etc.—and their styles of violence, and the degree to which they have been successful or have been destroyed.  It includes a comparison of so-called drug cartels in Mexico with the trajectories of the Sicilian, Russian and American Mafias. Collins is the author of Violence: A Micro-sociological Theory.  Contact: lynn.rapaport@pomona.edu or (909) 607-4349.

Feb. 12

Designating Gold’s Value in Vietnam —4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn 108 (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont). Professor of Anthropology Allison Truitt (Tulane University) will examine the paradoxical qualities of gold in Vietnam today by focusing on its symbolic place in moral economies of exchange, its designation as a privileged store of wealth and the strategies and tactics used by both ordinary citizens and government agents to control its circulation.  Gold, as she describes it, is a privileged vehicle for designating the politics of value in Vietnam today. Contact:  kayo.yoshikawa@pomona.edu or (909) 607-7467.

Feb. 13

Woodford-Eckis Geology Lecture: “The Environment of Earliest Earth: Decoding the Oldest Zircons” —8:15 p.m. Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Bruce Watson (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) will speak on “The Environment of Earliest Earth: Decoding the Oldest Zircons.” Contact: lori.keala@pomona.edu or (909) 621-8675.

Feb. 14  

Woodford-Eckis Geology Lecture: “Growth-rate Effects on Crystal Composition: From Phenocrysts to Climate Proxies”—11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Bruce Watson (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) will speak on “Growth-rate Effects on Crystal Composition: From Phenocrysts to Climate Proxies.” Contact: lori.keala@pomona.edu or (909) 621-8675.

Feb. 14

Lecture: “This America of Ours: Two Women’s Friendship, Spycraft, and Latin American Wartime Diplomacy”— noon, Pomona College Oldenborg Dining Hall (350 N. College Way, Claremont). Professor of English Elizabeth Horan (Arizona State University) will deliver a talk titled, “This America of Ours: Two Women’s Friendship, Spycraft, and Latin American Wartime Diplomacy.” Gabriela Mistral, self-educated Chilean woman, and Victoria Ocampo, an Argentine woman of wealth, develop a friendship during an era of tension in Europe. The two most influential and respected women writers of Latin America, Gabriela Mistral and Victoria Ocampo joined forces to aid children, artists and intellectuals escape the Spanish Civil War. When World War II pushed Mistral to Brazil, they combined Ocampo's vast fortune with Mistral's immense network of diplomatic contacts in order to aid the French Resistance and counter Nazi influence in Latin America. When the war ended, Mistral brought international pressure to have Ocampo released from an Argentine prison. This presentation puts the story of an unexpected friendship in the wider context of how to do research in privately-held and sensitive diplomatic archives, involving questions of history, sexuality and betrayal, while negotiating with lawyers, journalists and diplomats. Students swipe meal cards and CUC faculty and staff may sign-in for Oldenborg Dining Hall access. There is limited space for community members and there is a charge for lunch. Contact: (909) 621-8018 or visit http://oldenborg.pomona.edu/ and click on “Speaker Series.”

Feb. 14

Art After Hours—5-11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 15

Bluegrass and Old-Time Music —8 p.m. Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Richard Greene, “one of America’s most influential fiddlers,” (Bluegrass Unlimited) joins guitarist and Pomona College Professor of Music Joti Rockwell as they offer a program of down-home, all-American tunes. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 16

The Music of Karl Kohn—8 p.m. Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Pomona College faculty artists Karl and Margaret Kohn, piano; Rachel Rudich, flute; Joti Rockwell, banjo; Sarah Thornblade, violin; and Roger Lebow, cello, share the stage to perform the music of Karl Kohn from 1961-2011. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 20

The Five Pillars: Building a Creative Career—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn 108 (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont). Owen Wiseman '05 will deliver a lecture titled, “The Five Pillars: Building a Creative Career. ” A published writer with a full-time creative career, he will discuss the pitfalls of the creative life, and the necessary attributes of someone who aspires to that path. Discussion will include personal anecdotes, philosophy of creativity and concrete steps a person can take along the creative path. Wiseman has published a graphic novel, Samurai's Blood, on Image Comics, and also a literary memoir in Slake Magazine. Contact:  kayo.yoshikawa@pomona.edu or (909) 607-7467.

Feb. 20

Student Recital—8:15 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont). From Bach to Barber, Pomona College music students will perform from a wide array of musical literature. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 21

Lecture: "Cultural Differences, Implicit Cognitive Processes and Safety of Nuclear Energy"—4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn 101 (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont). Professor of Biology/Computation and Neural Systems Shinsuke Shimojo (California Institute of Technology) will deliver a lecture titled, "Cultural Differences, Implicit Cognitive Processes and Safety of Nuclear Energy," exploring the dichotomy between individualism in Western vs. collectivism in East Asian cultures, which has long been the cardinal axis of research and debate, in comparative cultural-neuropsychology.  Shimojo will describe several relevant aspects of implicit cognitive processes and what went wrong in the energy policy and the safety management at nuclear plants in Japan. Contact: kyoko.kurita@pomona.edu or (909) 621-8933.

Feb. 21

Artist Talk: “New Native Art Criticism”—4:30 p.m., Pomona College Smith Campus Center Room 208 (170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). In relation to the Pomona College Museum of Art exhibition, “Nuance of Sky,” artist Shanna Ketchum-Heap of Birds will deliver a lecture titled “New Native Art Criticism.” Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 21

Art After Hours—9-11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 22

Junior Recital with Anatolia Evarkiou-Kaku, Flute —8 p.m., Pomona College Lyman Hall, Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont). Flutist Anatolia Evarkiou-Kaku ’14 will perform a recital of music by Haydn, Liebermann and Widor. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

Feb. 22

“Life and Legacy of Constantine” Symposium—6 p.m., Smith Campus Center Room 201 (170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The “Life and Legacy of Constantine” symposium will open with a welcome address from Pomona College Professor of History Kenneth Wolf and a talk titled “Imagining Constantine” to be delivered by Ray Van Dam (University of Michigan). The symposium is sponsored by the William F. Podlich Distinguished Visitor program at Claremont McKenna College and by the Ena H. Thompson Fund at Pomona College. Contact: kenneth.wolf@pomona.edu or (909) 607-3452.

Feb. 23

“Life and Legacy of Constantine” Symposium  —9 a.m.-6 p.m., Pomona College Smith Campus Center Room 201 (170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The schedule of the  “Life and Legacy of Constantine” symposium, sponsored by the Intercollegiate Late Antique and Medieval Studies Program (LAMS) at the Claremont Colleges, is as follows:

Session 1 (9 a.m.)

  • Beth Digesser (UC Santa Barbara)—“Platonism in the palace: the character of Constantine’s theology”
  • Christopher Chinn (Pomona College)—“Constantinian pastoral? Nemesianus and Vergil”
  • Hal Drake (UC Santa Barabara)—“Constantine in 313”

Session 2 (10:30 a.m.)

  • Tina Sessa (Ohio State)—“Constantine, Silvester and the invention of ‘Papal’ Rome in Late Antiquity”
  • Shane Bjornlie (Claremont McKenna)—“Constantine in the imperial polemics of the 6th century”

Sessions 1-2 Open Discussion (11:30 a.m.)

Session 3 (1:30 p.m.)

  • Kenneth Wolf (Pomona College)—“Back to the future: Constantine and the idea of the last emperor in the Syriac apocalyptic tradition”
  • Judson Emerick (Pomona College)—“Now a new most Christian emperor Constantine has arisen in our days: Charlemagne and the first Christian emperor”
  • Brenda Schildgen (UC Davis)—“Dante and the Donation of Constantine”

Session 4 (3:30 p.m.)

  • Gerhard Jaritz (CEU) “Constantine in late medieval western art: just the son of a holy mother?”
  • Jen Jahner (Caltech) “’If possession be poysen’: endowment, sophistic and the legacy of Constantine in Late Medieval England”
  • George Gorse (Pomona College) “Constantine and the Renovatio Romae in the Renaissance and Baroque”

Session 5 Final Roundtable Discussion (5 p.m.)

Contact: kenneth.wolf@pomona.edu or (909) 607-3452.

Feb. 23

Concert: Happy 125th Birthday Pomona! With Genevieve Feiwen Lee and Friends—8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. Fourth St., Claremont). Faculty artist Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano, will be joined by Teresa Ling, violin; Roland Kato, viola; and Tobias Werner, cello, in Fauré's Piano Quartet in G Minor and more. Contact: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu, or visit: www.music.pomona.edu.

February 26

Lecture: Gender, Migration and Legality in the Rural Mountain West —noon, Pomona College Oldenborg Dining Hall, south side (350 N. College Way, Claremont). Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Leah Schmalzbauer (Montana State University) will draw from ethnographic research of gender, family and migration to explore Mexican migrants’ gendered experiences of (il)legality in the new rural destination of Southwest Montana and the unique challenges Montana presents.  Contact:  kayo.yoshikawa@pomona.edu or (909) 607-7467.

Feb. 28

Lecture: “Undocumented: The Theory and Practice of Illegality”—noon, Pomona College Oldenborg Dining Hall, south side ((350 N. College Way, Claremont). Ena H. Thompson Visiting Professor Aviva Chomsky (Salem State University) will deliver a lecture titled, “Undocumented: The Theory and Practice of Illegality.” Contact: victor.silverman@pomona.edu.

 

Feb. 28

Art After Hours—5-11 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Pomona College Museum of Art. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu, or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Exhibitions

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Nuance of Sky — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont).  Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic Native American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. The exhibition, curated by Heap of Birds, places paintings, mono-prints, and sculptures by Heap of Birds in dialogue with objects from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including Plains beadwork, Navajo turquoise and Pomo feather basketry. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Project Series 45: Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Project Series 45: Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove will consist of a suite of four new paintings based on Everberg’s exploration of the 1950 Japanese crime drama Rashomon by filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. For In a Grove, Everberg is creating an almost hallucinatory environment as the four new large paintings wrap the viewer in an immersive atmosphere that alludes to the slippery nature of truth. For more than 10 years, Everberg has explored issues of meaning, memory and history through fluid abstractions that have multiple narrative and painterly layers.  In strikingly beautiful paintings, she explores how images work and how images mark the elusive passage of time. Everberg has developed an innovative technique of pouring glossy enamel paint onto horizontal canvases creating lush surfaces that blur representation and abstraction. With vibrant color and shimmering light, the images shift and change as the viewer moves around the work. Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

Jan. 22-April 14, 2013

Exhibition: Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection — Tues.-Sun., noon-5 p.m. Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Many American artists of the 2oth and 21st centuries have made their artwork an integral part of their political activism. Some have created posters for specific campaigns, such as the election of political candidates or fundraising for civil rights organizations. Others have produced prints or paintings that speak to broader social or political issues, such as the pollution of the environment, the exploitation of agricultural and industrial workers, and racial intolerance. The images are sometimes direct and hard-hitting, sometimes poetic and introspective. This exhibition contains a sampling of such works from the late 1920s to the present drawn primarily from the permanent collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. Curated by Pomona College Professor in the Humanities and Art History Frances Pohl, in conjunction with the art history seminar “Art and Activism.” Contact:  (909) 607-7543 or museuminfo@pomona.edu or visit: www.pomona.edu/museum.

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