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Three-Part "It Happened at Pomona" Exhibition Set to Open at the Pomona College Museum of Art on August 30

Michael Asher, installation, 1970. Viewing out of gallery toward street from small triangular area, Pomona College Museum of Art. ©Michael Asher. Photograph courtesy of the Frank J. Thomas Archives.

Michael Asher, installation, 1970. Viewing out of gallery toward street from small triangular area, Pomona College Museum of Art. ©Michael Asher. Photograph courtesy of the Frank J. Thomas Archives.

Ed Moses, ILL. 245 B, 1971. Resin and powdered pigment on canvas. 96 x 132 in. (244 x 335.3 cm). Collection of the artist. ©Ed Moses. Photograph by Robert Wedemeyer.

Ed Moses, ILL. 245 B, 1971. Resin and powdered pigment on canvas. 96 x 132 in. (244 x 335.3 cm). Collection of the artist. ©Ed Moses. Photograph by Robert Wedemeyer.

Chris Burden, Untitled, 1966. Bronze. 6 1/2 x 5 in. (16.5 x 12.7 cm). Collection of the artist. ©Chris Burden. Photograph courtesy of the artist.

Chris Burden, Untitled, 1966. Bronze. 6 1/2 x 5 in. (16.5 x 12.7 cm). Collection of the artist. ©Chris Burden. Photograph courtesy of the artist.

From 1969 to 1973, a series of groundbreaking installation and performance art work took place at the Pomona College Museum of Art, reflecting a unique confluence of art faculty, curators, visiting artists and students, who went on to make significant contributions to contemporary art history.

On August 30, 2011, the Pomona College Museum of Art will open the first of its three-part exhibition series “It Happened at Pomona: Art at the Edge of Los Angeles 1969-1973.”

The first exhibition to open as part of the Pacific Standard Time collaboration among 60 Southern California institutions, “It Happened at Pomona” chronicles an era of intense intellectual and artistic ferment at Pomona College and will provide unprecedented and revelatory insight into the art history of post-WWII Los Angeles.

Part 1: Hal Glicksman at Pomona

August 30 – November 6, 2011

Hal Glicksman, a pioneering curator of Light and Space art, established one of the first museum residency programs in which artists used the museum as a studio space to create unique environments directly in a museum. This exhibition brings together re-creations of the site-specific works shown at Pomona College, along with artworks and documentation of other projects shown at the museum during this era.

The highlights will be a new work by Michael Asher in response to his landmark 1970 installation at Pomona College, re-creations of installations by Lloyd Hamrol and Tom Eatherton, and formative works by Lewis Baltz, Judy Chicago, Ron Cooper and Robert Irwin.

  • Michael Asher’s 1970 architectural intervention dramatically altered two of the Museum’s adjacent galleries. By preventing the Museum from closing its doors, the work is widely seen as a key work in the Conceptual Art practice known as Institutional Critique. For the new work, Asher requested that the museum remain open 24 hours a day for the run of the exhibition.
  • Judy Chicago is one of the most important feminist artists in the world as well as an author, educator and intellectual, whose work has been exhibited worldwide and included in hundreds of publications.
  • Robert Irwin, a Light and Space artist, focuses on installation art and landscape projects and is most well-known in Los Angeles for the design of the Central Garden at the Getty Center.

Part 2: Helene Winer at Pomona

December 3, 2011 – February 19, 2012

Helene Winer, later the director of Artists Space and Metro Pictures in New York, championed works by a group of artists who were channeling the experimental qualities of post-Minimalist sculpture into performance art, video and conceptual photography.

  • John Baldessari is an internationally renowned artist and is considered one of the key figures of Conceptual Art.
  • Ed Moses is an abstract painter and a Los Angeles icon whose work has appeared in exhibitions around the world.
  • Allen Ruppersberg perfectly fit a new direction in Conceptual Art that Winer saw emerging in Los Angeles in the early 1970s. Calling him one of the ultimate Los Angeles artists, she cites his use of the city—its popular culture, history, and locations—and his ability to move around without a standard studio as emblematic of a new generation of L.A. artists.
  • William Wegman is a contemporary photographer. Before he became known for his photography series involving his Weimaraners dogs in costumes and various poses, he explored the conceptual framework of photography.

The exhibition also includes work by Bas Jan Ader, Ger van Elk, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, Hirokazu Kosaka, William Leavitt, John McCracken, Allen Ruppersberg, Wolfgang Stoerchle and John White.

Part 3: At Pomona

March 10 – May 13, 2012

The final exhibition shows how the influence of the previous exhibitions contributed to the vibrant atmosphere in which artists and curators encouraged and expanded each other’s ideas and in the process developed what would become the most important aesthetic concerns of the late twentieth-century.

  • Chris Burden, Class of 1969, became a well-known performance artist and more recently has focused on sculpture and installation art. His most well-known piece in L.A. is Urban Light, a collection of restored cast iron street lamps on view at LACMA.
  • James Turrell, Class of 1965, is an internationally known Light and Space artist and the architect of Roden Crater. His Skyspace Dividing the Light is located on the Pomona campus.
  • Judy Fiskin, Class of 1966, is an internationally exhibited artist working primarily in photography and video.

The exhibition also includes work by Mowry Baden, Lewis Baltz, Michael Brewster, Chris Burden, Judy Fiskin, David Gray, Peter Shelton, Hap Tivey and Guy Williams.

Performance at Pomona – Judy Chicago, James Turrell, John White

January 21, 2012, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Part of the Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival, “Performance at Pomona” is a series of three performance pieces by artists represented in each of the three segments of the exhibition.

  • A Butterfly for Pomona, a new pyrotechnic performance by Judy Chicago (Merritt Football Field), based on her Atmosphere performances of the early 1970s.
  • Burning Bridges, a recreation of James Turrell's 1971 flare performance (Bridges Auditorium).
  • Preparation F, a 1971 performance by John White involving the Pomona College football team (Memorial Gymnasium, Rains Center).

“It Happened at Pomona” is curated by Rebecca McGrew, senior curator at the Pomona College Museum of Art, and Glenn Phillips, principal project specialist and consulting curator in the Getty Research Institute’s Department of Architecture and Contemporary Art. Support for “It Happened at Pomona” has been generously provided by the Getty Foundation.

For more information about the exhibits, related events or Museum hours, please visit www.pomona.edu/museum or call 909-621-8283.

“It Happened at Pomona: Art at the Edge of Los Angeles 1969-1973” is part of Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945 – 1980. Pacific Standard Time is an unprecedented collaboration of more than sixty cultural institutions across Southern California, coming together to tell the story of the birth of the L.A. art scene. Initiated through grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time will take place for six months beginning October 2011.