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Pomona College Events: January-February 2011

Book cover for "They Live"

New Roy E. Disney Professor of Creative Writing Jonathan Lethem will be hosting a screening of "They Live."

Photo by Hua Er from "China: Insights"

Photo by Hua Er from "China: Insights"

Exhibitions

January 22-April 10 - Art Exhibit: “China: Insights”

China: Insights presents a cross-section of contemporary documentary photography from mainland China, exploring the transition from the rural/agrarian environment to the urban/industrial setting in the People’s Republic of China. Seven documentary photographers—Chen Yuan Zhong, Hua Er, Jia Yu Chuan, Li Nan, Yang Yan Kang, Yu Haibo and Zhang Xinmin—record the tensions engendered by rapid change and persistent tradition in a dynamic China. Themes include rural Catholicism, matrilineal culture in an agrarian setting, the population shift from country to city, prostitution, gender and identity, typologies of urban citizenry, and the emergence of a thriving pop music/club scene as an index of internationalization. This touring exhibition is the first presentation of their work in the United States.

January 22-April 10 - Art Exhibit: “Stealing Fire: Prometheus”

José Clemente Orozco was the oldest among “Los tres grandes” of Mexican mural painting, and his “Prometheus” mural at Pomona College was his first in the U.S. On the 80th anniversary of “Prometheus,” which has looked down on Pomona’s Frary Dining Hall since 1930, the Art Museum presents “Stealing Fire.” Curated by Paulette Barros ’11 and theory friction practice ’12, the exhibit uses archival information to explain the mural’s Pomona history, its conservation and the student response to the mural over time.

Jan. 22 - Opening Reception: “China: Insights” Art Exhibit

5 p.m., Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont)

The Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont) is open: Tues.-Fri., 12-5 p.m.; Thursdays, 5-11 p.m. for “Art After Hours” with live music entertainment; and Sat.-Sun., 1-5 p.m. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Lectures, Screenings and Other Events

Jan. 26

Reading: Literary Series: Joseph McElroy – 4:15 p.m., Ena Thompson Reading Room (108), Pomona College Crookshank Hall (140 W. Sixth St., Claremont). Pomona College Department of English Literary Series hosts a reading by novelist Joe McElroy, author of Night Soul and Other Stories (2011), Smuggler’s Bible (2003), Lookout Cartridge (2003) and Women and Men (1993), among others. Information: (909) 607-2212.

Jan. 26

Lecture: “Mapping Women’s Islamic Activism in Egypt: Agenda for Change” – Pomona College Pearsons Hall (551 N. College Ave., Claremont). Sherine Hafez, assistant professor of Women’s Studies, UC Riverside, will give this talk co-sponsored by the Pomona College Gender & Women’s Studies Program and Religious Studies Department and Intercollegiate Women’s Studies at the Claremont Colleges. Information: (909) 607-2348.

Jan. 26

Pomona College Distinguished Speakers Series – Van Jones – 7 p.m., Pomona College Edmunds Ballroom (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The 2010-11 Pomona College Distinguished Speaker Series presents Anthony “Van” Jones, environmental advocate, civil rights activist and attorney, in the first of its events with the theme “Change Makers.” Jones will talk about “Beyond Green Jobs: The Next American Economy and the Politics of Hope.” He is the founder of three non-profit organizations: the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, Color of Change and Green for All. His first book, The Green Collar Economy, reached no. 12 on the New York Times Best Sellers list. Information: (909) 621-8611.

Jan. 27

Film: Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). "Papers" is a documentary that follows the lives of undocumented youth in America and the struggles that they face without legal status. Q&A session with the film’s director and reception will follow the screening. Presented by the Pomona College Asian American Resource Center and Pacific Basin Institute. Information: (909) 621-8639.

Jan. 27

Art After Hours – 5-11 p.m., the Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Bryan Penprase, professor of physics and astronomy, will give a talk and sign his new book “The Power of the Stars,” followed by a reception and star-gazing. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 1

Evolving Views of the Evolving Ocean: Co-evolution of Early Life and the Environment" – 11 a.m., Seaver North Auditorium (645 N. College Ave., Claremont). Timothy Lyons, professor of biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, will give this chemistry lecture on the evolving ocean and atmosphere and their cause-and-effect relationships with the origin and evolution of life. Information: (909) 621-8444.

Feb. 1

PSU: “The Blood Ban: Debating the Prohibitions of Blood Donations from Homosexual Men” – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Two speakers address the current ban on donated blood from men who have, at any point in their lifetime, had sex with another man. Dr. Jay Brooks, professor of pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, will argue for the ban, focusing on the rights of the blood receiver. Nathan Schaefer, director of public policy for Gay Men’s Health Crisis, will argue for the complete removal of the ban. Speakers will be asked to compare the U.S. blood donation policy to that in peer countries and to reconcile the impact of the ban on the gay community with the rights of the receiver. Information: www.psu.pomona.edu or michael.levine@pomona.edu.

Feb. 3

Spalding Lecture: “From the Control of Nature to Partnership” – 11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The 2011 Phebe Estelle Spalding Lecture presents Carolyn Merchant, Chancellor’s Professor of Environmental History, Philosophy and Ethics, UC Berkeley, on the topic “From the Control of Nature to Partnership.” Merchant is the author of Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture; EarthCare: Women and the Environment; Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World; and The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution. Information: tc004747@pomona.edu.

Feb. 3

“Kuroiwa Ruikô, Detective Fiction, and the Refashioning of the Meiji Subject” – 4 p.m., Pomona College Mason Building (550 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont), Room 5. During the late 1880s and the early 1890s, Meiji Japan witnessed a series of major political changes headlined by the promulgation of the constitution in 1889. Satoru Saito, assistant professor of Japanese, Rutgers University, examines how Kuroiwa Ruikô’s most famous detective stories, the translated Yûzai muzai (Guilty, not guilty; 1888) and his only original work of detective fiction Muzan (Merciless; 1889), not only entertained and inculcated readers on the difficulties of a judicial system based on evidence, but were concerned with the creation of a new reading public fit for the age after the Freedom and People’s Rights movement, a widespread liberal political movement that had driven many ambitious youths into action. Information: (909) 621-8616 or kyoko.kurita@pomona.edu.

Feb. 3

Art After Hours – 5-11 p.m., the Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). VOICES, a spoken word event co-sponsored by the Office of Black Studies, will accompany the “after hours” of Museum access. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 4

Music: Ussachevsky Memorial Festival – 8 p.m., Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont), Lyman Hall. This opening concert includes performances by Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano; Rachel Rudich, flute; Joti Rockwell, electric guitar; Mojave Trio (Sara Parkins, violin; Maggie Parkins, cello; Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano) and others. Featured composers include MaryClare Brzytwa, Karlheinz Essl, Tom Flaherty, Matthew Malsky, Frank Zappa and others. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 5

Music Lecture/Demo: Ussachevsky Memorial Festival - 4 p.m., Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont), Lyman Hall. Lecture/Demo given by Karlheinz Essl. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 5

Music: Ussachevsky Memorial Festival - 8 p.m., Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont), Lyman Hall. Concert includes performances by robots, Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano; Rachel Rudich, flute; Joti Rockwell, electric guitar; Mojave Trio (Sara Parkins, violin; Margaret Parkins, cello; Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano) and others performing music by Karlheinz Essl, Tom Flaherty, and others. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 7

Sustainability Dialog – Local Justice Issues – 7 p.m., Pomona College Hahn Building (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont), Room 101. Penny Newman, the Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice; Bill Gallegos, Communities for a Better Environment; and Pomona College students will discuss about Los Angeles-area environmental justice issues and the work being done to combat them. Information: (909) 607-1765 or www.pomona.edu/sustainability.

Feb. 8

Sustainability Film Festival: Green, Green Water – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Green, Green Water (2006) begins the 2nd Annual Sustainability Film Festival at Pomona College. This year’s theme is environmental justice. Filmmaker Dawn Mikkelson traces the source of her purchased "green energy" to the displacement and injustices exacted upon indigenous communities in rural Manitoba. Do you know where your water comes from? Information: (909) 607-1765 or www.pomona.edu/sustainability.

Feb. 9

PSU: “Ownership in the Age of the Mash-Up” – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). With mash-up artists gaining popularity and fan fiction influencing authors, transformative works have entered mainstream consciousness. Three experts on intellectual property rights will discuss the legality and merit of these works and the place they hold in our society, addressing the question: where does inspiration end and plagiarism start? The panel will include: Jonathan Lethem, Pomona’s Roy E. Disney Professor in Creative Writing and author of “The Ecstasy of Influence," and Doug Lichtman, UCLA Law professor representing the Associated Press in its suit against the creator of the “Obama Hope” poster. Information: www.psu.pomona.edu or michael.levine@pomona.edu.

Feb. 10

Sojourner Truth Lecture: Sonia Sanchez – 7:30 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The Claremont Colleges Intercollegiate Department of Africana Studies hosts the 26th Annual Sojourner Truth Lecture featuring Sonia Sanchez, poet, activist and scholar, who will give a talk titled “From the Black Arts to Hip Hop.” Sanchez has been recognized with both the Robert Frost Medal for distinguished lifetime service to American poetry and the Langston Hughes Poetry Award. Information: (909) 607-3070.

Feb. 10

Art After Hours – 5-11 p.m., the Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Museum. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 11

Music: Friday Noon Concert – 12:15 p.m., Balch Auditorium (Scripps College, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont). Pomona faculty Gwendolyn Lytle, soprano; Kira Blumberg, viola; and Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano; will perform music by Eric Lindholm. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 12

Music: Tawanda muChinyakare – 8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). Under the direction of Julia Tsitsi Chigamba, the Tawanda muChinyakare Ensemble boasts a collection of diverse and experienced musicians from Africa, the United States and beyond. True to its name, which means “deep traditional in the arts of our ancestors,” the ensemble performs traditional dance, mbira, drums, marimba, and song from Shona, and other tribal groups from around Zimbabwe. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 13

“Music of Arnold Schoenberg: A Discussion” – 4 p.m., Pomona College Thatcher Music Building (340 N. College Ave., Claremont), Lyman Hall. This panel discussion will offer insights into understanding Schoenberg’s music. Panelists include: Deborah How (pianist and scholar), Melanie Schoenberg (composer and granddaughter of Arnold Schoenberg), Kenneth Marcus (Assoc. Prof. of Music, University of La Verne) and Alfred Cramer (Assoc. Prof. of Music, Pomona College). Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 13

Music: “Schoenberg and More” – 7 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). The Formalist String Quartet: Andrew Tholl, violin; Mark Menzies and Andrew McIntosh, violin/viola; Ashley Walters, cello with Gayle Blankenburg, piano; and Heinz Blankenburg, narrator; perform Schnittke's Piano Quintet, Smith's String Quartet and Schoenberg's Fantasy for violin and piano, Op. 47, Six Little Piano Pieces, Op. 19, and Ode to Napoleon, Op. 41. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 15

Film Screening: They Live – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). This screening of the 1988 John Carpenter science fiction/horror film They Live, will be followed by an informal talk and Q&A with Pomona’s Roy E. Disney Prof. of Creative Writing Jonathan Lethem. Lethem joined the faculty this year and is the author of seven novels, most recently Chronic City (2009) and two short story collections. Information: (909) 607-2212.

Feb. 15

PSU: “Debating Hip Hop Culture” - 7 p.m., Pomona College Edmunds Ballroom (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Two leading cultural critics debate the contribution of Hip Hop culture to society, politics and gender relations. Bakari Kitwana, senior media fellow at the Harvard Law-based Jamestown Project and CEO of Rap Sessions: Community Dialogues on Hip-Hop, will debate Thomas Chatterton Williams, author of the New York Times bestselling Losing My Cool: How a Father’s Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture. Kitwana and Williams will address whether hip-hop culture is an expression of empowerment or degradation while considering how its political and sociological influence will evolve in the future. Information: www.psu.pomona.edu or michael.levine@pomona.edu.

Feb. 16

“The Year(s) of the Rabbit: 28 Years of Usagi Yojimbo and Counting” – 4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn Building (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont), Room 101. In this lecture-demonstration, award-winning comics artist Stan Sakai, creator of Usagi Yojimbo the samurai rabbit, will tell the history of the character, and illustrate a step-by-step look at how to create a story, from the initial idea to outline, thumbnail drawings, pencils, lettering, and inking. He will also talk about the research that is needed to make a story as authentic as possible. Reception to follow lecture. Information: (909) 621-8616.

Feb. 17

Hart Lecture: “The Struggle for Power and Survival in North America, 1600-1900” – 11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Pekka Hämäläinen, professor, UC Santa Barbara, and author of Comanche Nation (2009), will give a talk on "The Other American History: The Struggle for Power and Survival in North America, 1600-1900." He writes on North American Borderlands and Native American history. He won the 2009 Bancroft Prize and Merle Curti Award for Comanche Nation. Information: (909) 607-9435 or mp004747@pomona.edu.

Feb. 17

Film: South of the Border with Oliver Stone – 7 p.m., Pomona College Edmunds Ballroom (Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Screening of director Oliver Stone’s 2010 documentary “South of the Border,” focused on Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, followed by a Q&A with the director and Prof. Miguel Tinker Salas, whose expertise focuses on Latin American politics and history and who visits Venezuela frequently. Event is free and open to the public. Tickets are required for entry (limit two per person until all are distributed). Tickets will be available at the ASPC office beginning Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Information: (909) 607-2920 or Miguel.TinkerSalas@pomona.edu.

Feb. 17

Art After Hours – 5-11 p.m., the Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Museum. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 18

Friday Noon Concert: Zimbabwean Mbira Music – 12:15 p.m., Balch Auditorium (Scripps College, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont). Tony Perman presents Zimbabwean mbira music. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 18

10-Minute Play Festival – 4-6 p.m., Frank Dining Hall Blue Room (260 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont). Performance of five new, original plays inspired by songs and selected by a panel of faculty, students, and staff for production in this festival. Presented by the Pomona College Department of Theatre & Dance. Information: Joyce.Lu@pomona.edu, 909-607-4385, http://theatre.pomona.edu/2010-2011-productions/10-minute-play-festival/.

Feb. 19

Music: “Kohn + Kohn” – 8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). A celebration of performances at Pomona College by Karl Kohn and Margaret Kohn, who will be joined by Jason Goodman and Yuri Inoo, and perform music by Bartók, Boulez and Cataldi. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 20

Music: “Songs from Spain and Latin America” – 3 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). Acclaimed soprano Gwendolyn Lytle joins pianist Genevieve Feiwen Lee in a program of songs from Spain and Latin America by Abril, Garcia, Sierra and others. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 22

Reading: Literary Series: Salvador Plascencia – 4:15 p.m., Ena Thompson Reading Room (108), Pomona College Crookshank Hall (140 W. Sixth St., Claremont). Pomona College Department of English Literary Series hosts a reading by Salvador Plascencia, Pomona College Moseley Fellow and author of The People of Paper (2006), which was named a “Best Book" by the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle and the Financial Times. Information: (909) 607-2212.

Feb. 22

PBI: “Active Visual Politics: Anti-Colonialism, India and Gandhi’s Spinning Wheel – 4:15 p.m., Pomona College Hahn Building (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont), room 108. In 1909, as part of a larger anti-colonial move toward Indian self-sufficiency, Gandhi decided to revive the art of hand spinning cotton into thread. Spinning enabled wide participation in the struggle for independence by including those unable to leave their homes or jobs to march and offering an option for participation that avoided violence and imprisonment. The meditative, repetitive, syncopated action brought together individuals separated by class, religion, language and region. They literally produced thread while they conceptually produced a new, active Indian citizen. Rebecca Brown, interim director of East Asian Studies and visiting associate professor, Johns Hopkins University, will discuss how spinning cotton into thread and the spinning wheel (as symbol) become so central for the anti-colonial movement in India. Information: (909) 607-8035.

Feb. 23

Lecture: “Translating Witness: Antiviolence, Race and Women’s Grassroots Organizing” – 4:15 p.m., Ena Thompson Reading Room, Crookshank Hall (140 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Piya Chatterjee, assistant professor of Women’s Studies, UC Riverside. Co-sponsored by Gender & Women’s Studies and the Intercollegiate Women’s Studies at the Claremont Colleges. Information: (909) 607-2348.

Feb. 23

Film Screening: Documentaries from Vietnam - 7 p.m., Pomona College Hahn Building (420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont), Room 108. Jointly sponsored by the Pacific Basin Institute and Asian American Resource Center. Information: (909) 607-7856.

Feb. 23

Woodford-Eckis Geology Lecture: “Recent Slip History of the South-Central San Andreas Fault” – 8:15 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Dr. J. Ramón Arrowsmith, professor of geology, Arizona State University, will explain “Recent slip history of the south-central San Andreas Fault, from high-resolution topography and paleoseismology.” Arrowsmith conducts research in active tectonics, quantitative structural geology and geomorphology. He also develops geoinformatics tools for cyber infrastructure in the geosciences emphasizing high-resolution topography derived from LiDAR technology. Information: (909) 621-8675.

Feb. 24

Woodford-Eckis Geology Lecture: “Surface Processes and Fault-Related Deformation Using LiDAR Topography” – 11 a.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). Dr. J. Ramón Arrowsmith, professor of geology, Arizona State University, will explain “Meter-scale characterization of surface processes and fault-related deformation using LiDAR topography.” Arrowsmith conducts research in active tectonics, quantitative structural geology and geomorphology. He also develops geoinformatics tools for cyber infrastructure in the geosciences emphasizing high-resolution topography derived from LiDAR (optical remote sensing) technology. Information: (909) 621-8675.

Feb. 24

Art After Hours – 5-11 p.m., the Pomona College Museum of Art (330 N. College Ave., Claremont). Live entertainment accompanies special “Art After Hours” events at the Museum. Information: (909) 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum.

Feb. 24

Sustainability Film Festival: Gasland – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The Pomona College 2nd Annual Sustainability Film Festival presents Gasland (2010). This film, which won the Sundance Special Jury Prize and is nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, explores the complex world of "fracking," drilling technology used across the United States to extract natural gas, highlighting the efforts of local communities to organize against the contamination, secrets, and mysteries plaguing them because of drilling activity. Would you worry if you could light your tap water on fire? Following the screening, Josh Fox, the director/filmmaker, will participate in a question and answer session with the audience.Information: (909) 607-1765 or www.pomona.edu/sustainability.

Feb. 25

Friday Noon Concert: Stephan Moss - 12:15 p.m., Balch Auditorium (Scripps College, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont). Stephan Moss will perform piano music. Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 25

Music: Pomona College Orchestra – 8 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). Eric Lindholm, conductor, is joined by the 2010 Concerto Competition winners Eddie Sayles ’11, tenor and Sonya Ursell ’11, piano in a program including Britten's “Serenade for tenor, horn and strings,” Hindemith's “Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes” by Weber and Rachmaninoff's “Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor.” Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 27

Music: Pomona College Orchestra – 3 p.m., Pomona College Bridges Hall of Music (150 E. 4th St., Claremont). Eric Lindholm, conductor, is joined by the 2010 Concerto Competition winners Eddie Sayles ’11, tenor and Sonya Ursell ’11, piano in a program including Britten's “Serenade for tenor, horn and strings,” Hindemith's “Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes” by Weber and Rachmaninoff's “Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor.” Information: (909) 607-2671 or concerts@pomona.edu.

Feb. 28

2nd Annual Sustainability Film Festival: Waste Land – 7 p.m., Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre (lower level, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). The Pomona College 2nd Annual Sustainability Film Festival presents Wasteland (2010). This award-winning film explores life in the world’s largest trash city, Jardim Gramacho on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, as artist Vik Muniz photographs the community that relies on the dump's recyclable materials to make a living. During the three-year collaboration, Muniz learns more about this fragile community and their dreams for a better future. “Waste Land” received the 2010 Sundance Audience Award for Best World Cinema Documentary and is nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. Information: (909) 607-1765 or www.pomona.edu/sustainability.